Wednesday, 27 October 2010

Caprica officially cancelled, last five episodes to air in 2011

Some bad news and some worse news: the show has been officially cancelled and yesterday's episode is the last one we will see this year. If that's not enough, here is the punch: the season finale ends with a cliffhanger that will now stay unresolved.

Here is the statement from Syfy, via EW:

“The remaining first run episodes of Caprica – airing Tuesdays at 10/9c – will be removed from the schedule as of next Tuesday, November 2,” said the network in a statement. “These final five episodes of the season will be re-scheduled to air at a to be announced time in the first quarter of 2011, and will conclude the run of the series.”

“We appreciate all the support that fans have shown for Caprica and are very proud of the producers, cast, writers and the rest of the amazing team that has been committed to this fine series,” said Mark Stern, EVP of Original Programming at Syfy. “Unfortunately, despite its obvious quality, Caprica has not been able to build the audience necessary to justify a second season.”

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Actually gutted :'(

The Laughing Muse said...

BRING ON THE FANFIC!!!!

Mike B said...

Write in campaigns have started. A rabid fan has spoken and is trying to get people organized.

www.mycomicbookcrisis.com

Adam Clark said...

UNBELIEVABLE!!! That's the problem with TV nowadays. Everything relies on ratings.

Attention Networks:

There are people who enjoy Sci-Fi.

Anonymous said...

Because of things like this, I wont watch SyFi's next "big thing" until season 2 starts, because I dont want to get invested in a show only to have it cancelled (again)

Of course, if everyone did the same, then there'd never /be/ a season two of anything because the network exec's lack the stones to screen quality television.

Anonymous said...

Sy-Fy is a typical NBC owned company and botches everything.

BSG was bad enough with the incredible lags between seasons and breaking up of seasons to fragment the audience.

They did even worse with Caprica.

Needless to say after the last episodes of Caprica airs, I will never invest in anything on Sy-Fy again

JesseT said...

Well, guys, I am really sorry - I worked on Caprica as an Animator and visual effects artist and I have to say I am so disappointed that you guys have to wait and possibly never see the finale of Caprica - in no uncertain term I can safely say I busted my ass on those last three episodes. They are perhaps the best work I have ever done to date.

But I waited months to be able to tell anyone about what has quite possibly been the best job I have ever had in my career.

I really want to thank this blog and it's writers for keeping current, staying focused and getting the word out. Thanks everyone - those who watched, those who cared and those who wrote in to try and save the show.

Anonymous said...

Of course it has been cancelled. This is the *only* TV show I watch. I bought the iTunes season pass for this series to show my support (where I can watch in 720p with no commercials). I guess it will be DVD from here on in...

Mars said...

To can the show is bad enough, but then to push the episodes back to 2011 is just a complete dick move. Some relatively good news, however, is that Season 1.5 is scheduled for a 12/21/10 release date meaning we may see the last episodes on DVD before Syfy decide to pull airdates out their arse.

As for Syfy's decision to deny a Season 2, I'm completely heartbroken. Just like BSG, talented cast and crew telling a fascinating story. Yes, it started off a little slow and had trouble reining in the multiple story threads, but the real kick to the balls is that the new executive blood was clearly working because the show returned with a better pace and focused structure. It was just starting to ramp up and then they pull the plug after only four episodes.

I think Syfy owed everyone who created and watched the show to give it a little more of a chance given the success of its predecessor. Would a reduced additional season (like 13 episodes) been too much? Any chance of a measly TV movie to wrap up storylines? Oh, but I'm sure we can still "imagine greater" with plenty more opportunities to see wrestling and nits stumbling around in the dark.

SmackleDorf said...

I blame the all to common bloody Sci Fi 'purist' who are geeks who think they're nerds. Just because they're fans of Star Trek and Star Gate they think they're automatically smart.

Yet they refuse to watch Caprica because of the lack of aliens and spacecraft exploding. And that's the only reason they watched BSG. They're too stupid to understand the underlying themes and ethics, even though they think they're smart people.

Now we're going to have to suffer through the alternative panderingly uninspired BSG prequel 'Sparticus - In Space!!'

muldfeld said...

As Caprica Times said, a massive amount of fault lay with Syfy's idiotic scheduling, which fragmented the potential audience. I'd add that Syfy bungled their associations with NBC Universal, given that not a single actor from the show appeared on Leno or Jimmy Fallon's late night talk shows to advertize the show. And I advised as much before the show even premiered.

Also, the show should never have been abandoned by Ronald D. Moore. The pilot was very good, but BSG's quality largely was tied to his involvement, especially in writing scripts. Ron Moore did the most rewriting in Season 1; a bit less in Season 2 and 3 and none in Season 4; this was why the last season was the worst. Moore has that unique talent for introducing challenging political insight and finding excting yet believable ways of creating drama.

It's not for nothing that the show took a nosedive after the pilot, as Mark Verheiden and Michael Angeli's 2 scripts written in 2008 were severely rewritten and had their plot elements dragged out over several episodes for a slower pace. Jane Espenson is a hard worker and admirably passionate, but her sympathies lie more with conventional mainstream media issues like gay rights, not with bringing to the audience's attention the folly of US foreign policy and the hypocrisy of the media. (She rather likes Anderson Cooper, who embodies nearly everything wrong with the media's feigned outrage over nonsense and firmly pro-Israeli stance). She also is too tied to reliving "Buffy: The Vampire Slayer", as she touted that "Caprica" would involve teen drama, which was never very realistic or subtle or that original, however enjoyable it was. So, it's obvious to me that Philomon and the lab assistant's relationship to Zoe as well as Lacey and her relationship to Keon were inspired by this misguided notion of how to generate teen romance drama.

muldfeld said...

(continued)
Espenson also had this notion that she was the funniest writer and her awkward attempts at levity ruined the show. Firstly, her humor was often out of context and tacky on BSG, including The Plan; the funniest episode of the show was "Six Degrees of Separation" by Michael Angeli and likely rewritten by Moore, and the funniest moments of the series were all by Moore. The kind of over-the-top Buffy humor doesn't work.

Moreover, it's not accident that, while the pilot had fascinating dialogue for all the characers, though Amanda Graystone was rather underdeveloped, there was not a single episode until Season 1.5 that had embarrassingly lame dialogue. The pilot revealed Sister Clarice as a backer of terrorism to serve the STO and she had her best dialogue in a scene in which she implies this to Lacey. Zoe and Lacey had great arcs in the pilot.

Yet, under Espenson, Eick, and Pate, the female characters became far more cliche and unwilling to fully explore the moral ambiguity the series needed and the pilot demanded be followed through. Clarice became more obsessed with conspiring (for what ends it was unclear and appeared silly) and taking drugs -- like some unbearable homage to the worst elements of "Six Feet Under" and every other cliche exploration of drug use. Amanda ceased being the kind of person who would be a successful doctor and endlessly repeated the same arc of whining about losing her daughter and dealing with the Global Defense Department's Agent Durham; in a season full of repetitive behavior for all the characters that hers was the worst really says something awful. Espenson planned to have Amanda's visions of her dead brother prove to be a doppelganger Vergis hired to drive her mad -- which is the most ridiculous story I've heard. Yet, when Amanda was already going mad, David Eick could only band-aid the arc by having her really see a what had to be a delusion -- and therefore she had to be going mad, which was a terrible arc in itself. In addition, Lacey and Zoe didn't behave like two young women faced with life and death, but their narratives seemed forced into high school teen drama; the worst image embodying this folly was Lacey hanging out on swings with Keon, plotting joining the STO. Neither character had the stresses any teen would be going through. If ratings were so vital, then Jane Espeson should never have been allowed to experiment; I really don't understand what tone David Eick talks about finding for the show; the pilot was fine!

muldfeld said...

(continued)
Espenson also had this notion that she was the funniest writer and her awkward attempts at levity ruined the show. Firstly, her humor was often out of context and tacky on BSG, including The Plan; the funniest episode of the show was "Six Degrees of Separation" by Michael Angeli and likely rewritten by Moore, and the funniest moments of the series were all by Moore. The kind of over-the-top Buffy humor doesn't work.

Moreover, it's not accident that, while the pilot had fascinating dialogue for all the characers, though Amanda Graystone was rather underdeveloped, there was not a single episode until Season 1.5 that had embarrassingly lame dialogue. The pilot revealed Sister Clarice as a backer of terrorism to serve the STO and she had her best dialogue in a scene in which she implies this to Lacey. Zoe and Lacey had great arcs in the pilot.

Yet, under Espenson, Eick, and Pate, the female characters became far more cliche and unwilling to fully explore the moral ambiguity the series needed and the pilot demanded be followed through. Clarice became more obsessed with conspiring (for what ends it was unclear and appeared silly) and taking drugs -- like some unbearable homage to the worst elements of "Six Feet Under" and every other cliche exploration of drug use.

Amanda ceased being the kind of person who would be a successful doctor and endlessly repeated the same arc of whining about losing her daughter and dealing with the Global Defense Department's Agent Durham; in a season full of repetitive behavior for all the characters that hers was the worst really says something awful. Espenson planned to have Amanda's visions of her dead brother prove to be a doppelganger Vergis hired to drive her mad -- which is the most ridiculous story I've heard. Yet, when Amanda was already going mad, David Eick could only band-aid the arc by having her really see a what had to be a delusion -- and therefore she had to be going mad, which was a terrible arc in itself.

muldfeld said...

(continued again)
In addition, Lacey and Zoe didn't behave like two young women faced with life and death, but their narratives seemed forced into high school teen drama; the worst image embodying this folly was Lacey hanging out on swings with Keon, plotting joining the STO. Neither character had the stresses any teen would be going through. If ratings were so vital, then Jane Espeson should never have been allowed to experiment; I really don't understand what tone David Eick talks about finding for the show; the pilot was fine!

Exceptions to Season 1.0's disaster are the episodes "There Is Another Sky" and "Ghosts in the Machine" essentially for Daniel Graystone's brilliant arcs.

Finally with Season 1.5, things improved drastically and the latest episde, "False Labor" was better than the pilot in many ways. Sister Clarice finally began to embrace her terroristic side in "Unvanquished" and we had a sense of the context of her role within the STO and the STO's relationship to the church. Amanda Graystone finally became active and I started to love her character for the first time in "False Labor". Sam Adama became infinitely more interesting as he embraced his political sympathies for Sagitaron. Lacey and Zoe still lack what made them fascinating in the pilot, but they're getting there. Although, Joseph was often interesting in Season 1.0, he is becoming more interesting. Daniel Graystone was always the best character and he continues to fascinate, especially in Season 1.5. Most importantly, there has not been any bad dialogue this half season and that's a revolutionary accomplishment!

Syfy is making a short-sighted huge mistake. This is another show for which it can be remembered. Its ratings winners won't be. Also, holding off airing the episodes in November might be understandable because advertizing rates are established then, but they could be aired in December. This is a kick in the face to fans. Most disgustingly, Syfy was never clear that ratings would have to be high to continue watching the episodes; they didn't even wait until mid-November, which was the deadline to make a decision on renewing the show. This is insulting to those who worked on the show and to fans.

I'm devastated by this cancellation, especially because Ron Moore seems to have tried to be more involved, planning Season 2 in greater detail than he ever planned a BSG season.

muldfeld said...

(continued again)
In addition, Lacey and Zoe didn't behave like two young women faced with life and death, but their narratives seemed forced into high school teen drama; the worst image embodying this folly was Lacey hanging out on swings with Keon, plotting joining the STO. Neither character had the stresses any teen would be going through. If ratings were so vital, then Jane Espeson should never have been allowed to experiment; I really don't understand what tone David Eick talks about finding for the show; the pilot was fine!

Exceptions to Season 1.0's disaster are the episodes "There Is Another Sky" and "Ghosts in the Machine" essentially for Daniel Graystone's brilliant arcs.

Finally with Season 1.5, things improved drastically and the latest episde, "False Labor" was better than the pilot in many ways. Sister Clarice finally began to embrace her terroristic side in "Unvanquished" and we had a sense of the context of her role within the STO and the STO's relationship to the church. Amanda Graystone finally became active and I started to love her character for the first time in "False Labor". Sam Adama became infinitely more interesting as he embraced his political sympathies for Sagitaron. Lacey and Zoe still lack what made them fascinating in the pilot, but they're getting there. Although, Joseph was often interesting in Season 1.0, he is becoming more interesting. Daniel Graystone was always the best character and he continues to fascinate, especially in Season 1.5. Most importantly, there has not been any bad dialogue this half season and that's a revolutionary accomplishment!

Syfy is making a short-sighted huge mistake. This is another show for which it can be remembered. Its ratings winners won't be. Also, holding off airing the episodes in November might be understandable because advertizing rates are established then, but they could be aired in December. This is a kick in the face to fans. Most disgustingly, Syfy was never clear that ratings would have to be high to continue watching the episodes; they didn't even wait until mid-November, which was the deadline to make a decision on renewing the show. This is insulting to those who worked on the show and to fans.

I'm devastated by this cancellation, especially because Ron Moore seems to have tried to be more involved, planning Season 2 in greater detail than he ever planned a BSG season.

muldfeld said...

(continued a 2nd time)
In addition, Lacey and Zoe didn't behave like two young women faced with life and death, but their narratives seemed forced into high school teen drama; the worst image embodying this folly was Lacey hanging out on swings with Keon, plotting joining the STO. Neither character had the stresses any teen would be going through. If ratings were so vital, then Jane Espeson should never have been allowed to experiment; I really don't understand what tone David Eick talks about finding for the show; the pilot was fine!

Exceptions to Season 1.0's disaster are the episodes "There Is Another Sky" and "Ghosts in the Machine" essentially for Daniel Graystone's brilliant arcs.

muldfeld said...

(continued a third time)
Finally with Season 1.5, things improved drastically and the latest episde, "False Labor" was better than the pilot in many ways. Sister Clarice finally began to embrace her terroristic side in "Unvanquished" and we had a sense of the context of her role within the STO and the STO's relationship to the church. Amanda Graystone finally became active and I started to love her character for the first time in "False Labor". Sam Adama became infinitely more interesting as he embraced his political sympathies for Sagitaron. Lacey and Zoe still lack what made them fascinating in the pilot, but they're getting there. Although, Joseph was often interesting in Season 1.0, he is becoming more interesting. Daniel Graystone was always the best character and he continues to fascinate, especially in Season 1.5. Most importantly, there has not been any bad dialogue this half season and that's a revolutionary accomplishment!

Syfy is making a short-sighted huge mistake. This is another show for which it can be remembered. Its ratings winners won't be. Also, holding off airing the episodes in November might be understandable because advertizing rates are established then, but they could be aired in December. This is a kick in the face to fans. Most disgustingly, Syfy was never clear that ratings would have to be high to continue watching the episodes; they didn't even wait until mid-November, which was the deadline to make a decision on renewing the show. This is insulting to those who worked on the show and to fans. I'm devastated by this cancellation, especially because Ron Moore seems to have tried to be more involved, planning Season 2 in greater detail than he ever planned a BSG season.

There are very few shows with the ability to talk about the most pressing -- and therefore, the most controversial -- issues of our time. Whatever, the criticism of Syfy, it was always willing to allow serious political exploration and an understanding of the causes of terrorism in a way from which the mainstream media always shrank. The loss of Caprica (in its incarnation in the pilot and Season 1.5) is a blow to a means to bring real understanding of "the other" through entertainment.

muldfeld said...

(continued a third time)
Finally with Season 1.5, things improved drastically and the latest episde, "False Labor" was better than the pilot in many ways. Sister Clarice finally began to embrace her terroristic side in "Unvanquished" and we had a sense of the context of her role within the STO and the STO's relationship to the church. Amanda Graystone finally became active and I started to love her character for the first time in "False Labor". Sam Adama became infinitely more interesting as he embraced his political sympathies for Sagitaron. Lacey and Zoe still lack what made them fascinating in the pilot, but they're getting there. Although, Joseph was often interesting in Season 1.0, he is becoming more interesting. Daniel Graystone was always the best character and he continues to fascinate, especially in Season 1.5. Most importantly, there has not been any bad dialogue this half season and that's a revolutionary accomplishment!

Syfy is making a short-sighted huge mistake. This is another show for which it can be remembered. Its ratings winners won't be. Also, holding off airing the episodes in November might be understandable because advertizing rates are established then, but they could be aired in December. This is a kick in the face to fans. Most disgustingly, Syfy was never clear that ratings would have to be high to continue watching the episodes; they didn't even wait until mid-November, which was the deadline to make a decision on renewing the show. This is insulting to those who worked on the show and to fans.

I'm devastated by this cancellation, especially because Ron Moore seems to have tried to be more involved, planning Season 2 in greater detail than he ever planned a BSG season.

muldfeld said...

(continued a 4th time)
There are very few shows with the ability to talk about the most pressing -- and therefore, the most controversial -- issues of our time. Whatever, the criticism of Syfy, it was always willing to allow serious political exploration and an understanding of the causes of terrorism in a way from which the mainstream media always shrank. The loss of Caprica (in its incarnation in the pilot and Season 1.5) is a blow to a means to bring real understanding of "the other" through entertainment.

In a sense, the show would have succeeded with Ron Moore at the helm. Whatever my criticism of other artists who took charge in the wake of his departure, if he really believed in his baby, HE should have been there in the trenches, rewriting scripts heavily, fighting for this new kind of dramatic (for crying out loud, why did they keep using the derogatory term "soap opera"?) sci fi (which everyone suspected would be a long shot ratings-wise), not just orchestrating and advising from afar. From the start, it would have been beautiful...

muldfeld said...

I'm really sorry about the messed up posts. My computer broke down and I'm using a really old computer (bought in 2001) with out-dated software and browsers, and when I tried to enter a comment before, the site said it was too long, so I re-edited comments and posted them. You can delete them all if you like and I'll repost my saved comments when I get to my folks' home this weekend and use my mother's new computer.

Sorry again. Also, I meant to say that not a single episode since the pilot didn't have lame dialogue until Season 1.5.

Anonymous said...

I have the equipment for neilsen that gives ratings to all tv channels and because syfy took away caprica, even though 10's millions fans did watch it faithfully, i have decided that in the next year I will never watch syfy. This way its ratings on all thier programs will be nil and they can see how pissed i am that they took off caprica, but to top it off we have had the same old repeats of ghost hunters and many other programs, during the winter people are home watching tv but they put repeats on, enough of this crap syfy your screwed!

Anonymous said...

I do not understand the decision to cancel Caprica! If it is because of ratings that is a mistake. The typical science fiction viewer is not a nielson candidate. However, I believe that the powers that be at syfy network were intimated or afraid of the religious under currents. Caprica was a thinking persons show, and as most networks have proving they are dumbing down all of television. (eg. NCSI,bones and Hawaii 5 O